1. fleurdulys:

The Stars of the Morning - Sarah Paxton Ball Dodson

    fleurdulys:

    The Stars of the Morning - Sarah Paxton Ball Dodson

  2. fleurdulys:

Fountain of Youth - Paul-Jean Gervais
1908

    fleurdulys:

    Fountain of Youth - Paul-Jean Gervais

    1908

  3. magictransistor:

Man Ray. Duchamp Behind ‘Rotary Glass Plates’ in Motion. 1920.

    magictransistor:

    Man Ray. Duchamp Behind ‘Rotary Glass Plates’ in Motion. 1920.

  4. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it. "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it.

    "La Grande Danse macabre des vifs" (1905), a work by Martin van Maële - a French artist from the 20th century, renowned for his work in the field of erotic literature - composed by four series of ten satirical and erotic illustrations in which sexuality is linked to death, making fun of the catholic misconception of it.

  5. "The Bathers" (1875) - Gustave Clarence Rodolphe Boulanger "A Favourite Custom" (1909) - Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema "The Bathers" (1875) - Gustave Clarence Rodolphe Boulanger "A Favourite Custom" (1909) - Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

    "The Bathers" (1875) - Gustave Clarence Rodolphe Boulanger 
    "A Favourite Custom" (1909) - Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

  6. blackpaint20:

The Witches Sabbath is a work by Louis Boulanger, French, 1806-1867, and illustrates a poem by his countryman, Victor Hugo. Boulander was a Romantic painter, lithographer and illustrator.

    blackpaint20:

    The Witches Sabbath is a work by Louis Boulanger, French, 1806-1867, and illustrates a poem by his countryman, Victor Hugo. Boulander was a Romantic painter, lithographer and illustrator.

  7. "Bacchante Enivree" (1882) - Adolphe-Alexandre LesrelOpera di Milo Manara "Bacchante Enivree" (1882) - Adolphe-Alexandre LesrelOpera di Milo Manara

    "Bacchante Enivree" (1882) - Adolphe-Alexandre Lesrel

    Opera di Milo Manara

  8. 
I am very sad to report that Carla Laemmle, one of our last direct links to the world of silent cinema, has passed away at 104.
Born in 1909 with the given name Rebecca, she later changed her name to Carla. The niece of Universal Studios founder Carl Laemmle, she danced as the prima ballerina in The Phantom of the Opera (1925) and spoke the first line of dialogue in the first sound horror film, Dracula (1931). May she rest in peace and be forever remembered.

    I am very sad to report that Carla Laemmle, one of our last direct links to the world of silent cinema, has passed away at 104.

    Born in 1909 with the given name Rebecca, she later changed her name to Carla. The niece of Universal Studios founder Carl Laemmle, she danced as the prima ballerina in The Phantom of the Opera (1925) and spoke the first line of dialogue in the first sound horror film, Dracula (1931). May she rest in peace and be forever remembered.

    (Source: nitratediva, via bitchwitched)

  9. 
Life and Death Contrasted (c.1770)
A striking image from the British engraver and publisher Valentine Green, illustrating the idea that life, with all its frivolity and distractions (symbolised by the romance novel, parlour games, and high society lady in all her finery) is in fact – echoing the sentiment of Ecclesiastes (quoted on the obelisk) – nothing but “vanity”, all lives as they do inevitably ending in death. (via)

    Life and Death Contrasted (c.1770)

    A striking image from the British engraver and publisher Valentine Green, illustrating the idea that life, with all its frivolity and distractions (symbolised by the romance novel, parlour games, and high society lady in all her finery) is in fact – echoing the sentiment of Ecclesiastes (quoted on the obelisk) – nothing but “vanity”, all lives as they do inevitably ending in death. (via)

    (Source: vintagegal, via deforest)

  10. Circle Limit with Butterflies (1950) - M. C. Escher

    Circle Limit with Butterflies (1950) - M. C. Escher